Cambodia: Looking Back on the Future

May 4 – June 14, 2017

LIM Muy Theam Flinn Gallery
Cambodia: Looking Back on the Future takes a deeper look at contemporary art in Cambodia, the subtleties and complexities that characterize a fluid present moving between past and future.  With a tendency towards personal narratives, the figure has emerged, forming a thread to tie together the complexities of personal histories, social issues, identity, displacement and memory.  Curators: Debra Fram + Barbara Richards

Anida Yoeu ALI 

Anida Yoeu ALI Flinn Gallery
Anida Yoeu ALI Flinn Gallery
Anida Yoeu ALI Flinn Gallery

CHOV Theanly 

CHOV Theanly Flinn Gallery
CHOV Theanly Flinn Gallery
CHOV Theanly Flinn Gallery

HENG Ravuth

HENG Ravuth Flinn Gallery
HENG Ravuth Flinn Gallery
HENG Ravuth Flinn Gallery

KONG Vollak

KONG Vollak Flinn Gallery
KONG Vollak Flinn Gallery

LEANG Seckon 

LEANG Seckon Flinn Gallery

LIM Muy Theam

LIM Muy Theam Flinn Gallery

NEAK Sophal

NEAK Sophal Flinn Gallery
NEAK Sophal Flinn Gallery
NEAK Sophal Flinn Gallery

OEUR Sokuntevy

OEUR Sokuntevy Flinn Gallery
OEUR Sokuntevy Flinn Gallery
OEUR Sokuntevy Flinn Gallery

Chath PIERSATH

Chath Piersath Flinn Gallery
Chath Piersath Flinn Gallery
Chath Piersath Flinn Gallery

YIM Maline

YIM Maline Flinn Gallery
YIM Maline Flinn Gallery
YIM Maline Flinn Gallery
THURSDAY, MAY 4
OPENING RECEPTION

6:00 – 8:00 pm / Flinn Gallery

FRIDAY, MAY 5

THE MISSING PICTURE
FILM
8:00 pm / Cole Auditorium, Greenwich Library
In this Academy Award nominated film, filmmaker Rithy Panh uses clay figures, archival footage, and his narration to recreate the atrocities Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge committed between 1975 and 1979.
On April 17, 1975, the day the Khmer Rouge seized the capital, Phnom Penh, the 13-year-old Rithy Panh, his family, and millions more were driven from that city and other towns and villages, and straight into hell. Four years later, many of his relatives including his father, mother, sisters, and a niece and nephew, were dead. Decades later, Mr. Panh, now a filmmaker, has told his story in this movie in which the act of
rememberance serves as a form of resistance.

The Flinn Gallery will be open for Art Lounge prior to the film, from 6:00 – 7:45 pm

SATURDAY, MAY 6

CAMBODIAN MUSIC CONCERT
3:30 pm / Cole Auditorium, Greenwich Library
This concert showcases the breadth of Cambodian music, from popular mahaori songs, to music used for weddings and dance performances, to the innovative ways some musicians are experimenting with musical traditions. In Cambodia and Cambodian-American communities in the United States, music is used during festivals, ceremonies, and rites of passage, and it is also linked with Cambodians’ national and personal identities. Between songs, the performers will explain the meaning and symbolism as well as their own personal associations with the music. This concert presents a vivid snapshot of Cambodia’s music and the numerous ways in which these musical traditions are linked with people’s lives.
The instruments that will be used during the performance are: Khim (hammer dulcimer), Takay (zither), Roneat (xylophone), Tro Sao (2-stringed fiddle), Sko Dae (hand drum), and the Kse Diev (monochord zither).

Musicians: Song Heng, Sovann Khon, Ya Rath, Kimhan Meas and Jeff Dyer

SUNDAY, MAY 7

TYING THE FOOT: MEANING THROUGH HUMOR & WIT IN CAMBODIA
CURATOR TALK
1:30 pm / Second Floor Meeting Room, Greenwich Library
The subtle and codified expressions of emotions, politics, sexuality, and other taboo subjects are well established in the arts, but are not always obvious to visitors. This talk will take examples from pop culture, literature and contemporary art that are subversive and mischievous. This mechanism is especially applied to critical and political commentary, and may become increasingly necessary with the threat of a new censorship law.
Talk by Dana Langlois, Co-Curator of Cambodia: Looking Back on the  Future.

AND

NEVER FALL DOWN

BOOK DISCUSSION
3:00 pm / Second Floor Meeting Room, Greenwich Library
Based on the life of Cambodian peace advocate Arn Chorn-Pond, Never Fall Down is the story of how one Cambodian boy survived the horrors of the Khmer Rouge regime. Only eleven when the Khmer Rouge invades his hometown, Arn is forced into slave labor, and his life for the next four years (1975-1979) is a nightmare of suffering, deprivation, and death. National Book Award finalist Patricia McCormick has seamlessly interwoven fact and fiction to create a powerfully unforgettable story of war and survival.
Talk by Arn Chorn-Pond and author Patricia McCormick
 
SATURDAY, MAY 13
SINGLE BREAK POT
PERFORMANCE ART BY AMY LEE SANFORD
11:00 am / Flinn Gallery, Greenwich Library
Sitting in a clearly defined circle of cloth on the floor, Amy will break a traditional clay pot and meticulously glue it back together. This breaking and remaking brings attention to cycles of trauma, both personal and historical. Single Break Pot is a meditative and introspective performance, one that reflects the slow, complex process of mending and transforming. For the artist, the physical and mental challenge of maintaining the concentration and patience to carry out the task is an integral part of the piece.

AND

ART IN POST-CONFLICT CAMBODIA: WHAT THAT MEANS TODAY

PANEL DISCUSSION
3:00 pm / Cole Auditorium, Greenwich Library
This panel discussion will explore the context of artists and culture in Cambodia today. At the end of the Khmer Rouge period, when nearly 90% of Cambodia’s artists were lost, the urgency of recovering Cambodia’s rich artistic culture was a priority. Finding those remaining artists and passing on Cambodia’s traditions to the next generation was a heroic effort. Now, some thirty years later, a new generation of Cambodian artists is working in new directions, creating a contemporary palette that often mixes references of the traditional and the modern, history and future.
Moderator: Rachel Cooper; Panelists: Dana Langlois, Phloeun Prim, Amy Lee Sanford and Toni Shapiro-Phim

SATURDAY, MAY 20

DON’T THINK I’VE FORGOTTEN: CAMBODIA’S LOST ROCK AND ROLL
FILM / Q&A
2:00 / Second Floor Meeting Room, Greenwich Library
During the 60’s and early 70’s, as the war in Vietnam threatened its borders, a new music scene emerged in Cambodia that took Western rock and roll and stood it on its head – creating a sound like no other. Cambodian musicians crafted this sound from the various rock music styles sweeping America, England and France, adding the unique melodies and hypnotic rhythms of their traditional music.
Through the eyes, words and songs of its popular music stars of the 50s, 60s and 70s, Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten: Cambodia’s Lost Rock and Roll examines and unravels Cambodia’s tragic past, culminating in the genocidal Khmer Rouge’s dismantling of the society and murder of two million of its citizens. Combining interviews of the surviving Cambodian musicians themselves with never-before-seen archival material and rare songs, this documentary tracks the twists and turns of Cambodian music as it morphs into rock and roll, blossoms, and is nearly destroyed along with the rest of the country.
Q&A with Filmmaker John Pirozzi following the film